Hamish Bowles talks Balenciaga & Spain

Opening on March 26th, Mr. Hamish Bowles' new exhibition Balenciaga and Spain brings over 100 pieces of priceless haute couture to the de Young museum. Expanding the retrospective from its showing at the Queen Sofia Spanish Institute in New York (that exhibit offered only 50 pieces), the exhibition will highlight the master couturier's work through traditional Spanish themes.

As Mr. Bowles' was in town this week to prepare for the exhibition, I was lucky enough to sit down with him and learn more about the inscrutible designer and Mr. Bowles himself.

Balenciaga, Bolero jacket of burgundy silk velvet and jet passementerie embroidery by Bataille, winter 1946.

Collection of Hamish Bowles, photograph by Kerry Komer.

P&C: Allow me to begin by reading you this quote from Francine du Plessix Gray's novel October Blood, which is overall an enteraining satire on Carmel Snow...

"In the center of the living room there sometimes sat Cristobal Balenciaga, Mother’s best friend in Paris, dolorously sipping chamomile tea. Infrequently exposed to clothes other than his own, he mostly came to curse at the vulgarity of the costumes being paraded in Mother’s suite. He was a thin, depressed, nomadic Spaniard with perennial dark glasses and some twelve houses spread over the map of Europe, all of which he hated. He would spend a few days at his hacienda in Seville and leave it, complaining of the noise, go to his chalet in Switzerland to cure his sinuses and sell it the following morning, complaining of the insects. His only passion besides his work was looking for antiques, and he could spend a month piling up Renaissance tables and Persian rugs to furnish a flat in Barcelona which he’d leave after a night because he disliked the Gaudi building across the street. He traveled everywhere with a long-haired dachshund called Zurbarán and carried in his pocket several immaculate linen handkerchiefs with which he wiped the dog’s bottom after each sidewalk performance. When he and my mother greeted each other every summer he would scrutinize her dress with a tragic air, hands on her shoulders, to be sure that she was wearing one of his originals, and then tug at different parts of her collar, sleeves, waistline to show that she was not wearing it properly.”

Is this an accurate description?

Hamish Bowles: (Laughs) Bettina Ballard does describe him as obsessed with antiqueing, piling up antique rugs... yes, that he was constantly working on apartments in Madrid, and then not being able to sleep there because of the noise… It is very true to say that he could not understand the clothes produced by his contemporaries. By extension, couldn’t understand why his friends & clients would choose to wear them.

There is a story in Bettina Ballard['s autobiography In My Fashion] – about an occasion where Balenciaga was accompanying Ballard to an event and she asked him to do up the back of her Dior dress, which had 30 buttons up the back… He kept muttering "Christian est complétement fou!"- "he's completely mad!" So, there are some very funny resonances. But he (Balenciaga) disdained from involving himself in the public side of the house, focusing on the technical, behind the scenes work & producing the clothes themselves… For special friends he would be involved in the fittings.

In fact, it was sort of a nightmare! He shared with Chanel this obsession with the way a sleeve was set. He would sort of torment his tailors – they would have to take sleeves in and out time & time again. Bettina Ballard has a funny story about this suit that she was having made, [it] was so battered & bruised by his constant thing, that she ended up wearing the perfectly made, line for line copy that was made by Ben Zuckerman – one of the very high end 7th Avenue copyists – she wore HIS suit, and Balenciaga never noticed.... He was a fastidious technician.

Cristobal Balenciaga circa 1952, copyright Bettmann/CORBIS images

From your description in the intro, it was more about how reclusive he was; I find that’s so common when you read about Yves Saint Laurent, or Chanel, - these people were sort of crotchety, and known for being in their own bubble of a world. Is that a factor for being a design genius in a way?

I don’t think so. I think a lot of Balenciaga’s contemporaries were extremely… they flourished in social situations. Jacques Fath gave endless parties, Dior even. I certainly think that Chanel in her day was extraordinarily social, and sort of a lynch-pin of a certain kind of artistic society in Paris in the old days. (I mean she did become sort of a crotchety old woman late in life,)… Saint Laurent had his own demons to contend with.

Balenciaga was naturally quite shy. He had an intimate circle of friends, mostly people he was involved with through his work. He just didn’t have time for a mundane life really, or the inclination for it. His great partner in life – D’Attainville, died in 1948, and Balenciaga became sort of increasingly retiring after that.  But I think his focus was just on his work, perfecting & honing his craft.

I loved what you said about how he would use his client’s physical quirks to develop a specific design detail…shortening the sleeves, doing a special collar. Today, when you see designers work on Project Runway for instance, they’re stumped when faced with a "real" body type. Do you think that that is something that can be learned, or did Balenciaga have a natural talent for it? Can you practice at that and learn how to design for your clients in a more specific way, using not the standard stick-figure model?

I think that Balenciaga’s whole apprenticeship and training was as a tailor and then as a dressmaker. In that capacity, his entire working life would have been one-on-one interactions with clients. Day-in, day-out he would be making clothes to fix specific body types, and you know for clients that would each have strong opinions about what their physical assets (and debits) were, and they would conspire together to enhance or minimize those as the case might be. That was his whole training.

When he opened his own couture house in Spain, he would go to Paris to buy the sample garments of the designers whom he admired, and he would bring those back to his couture establishments in San Sebastian and Barcelona and Madrid, and he would adapt those to the needs & demands of his clients. So I think that he’s constantly aware of different body types, and I think that in his collections he was careful to put in things that would suit, that would be adaptable to clients with different needs and looks and body types.

It’s a different world today. He was making – he was doing couture. Each garment that he made was made specifically for a client. So, it’s like made-to-measure.  In ready to wear, it’s not so easy to do that. And I think also body types have changed in a way, but it’s just a different craft; it’s bespoke and ready-to-wear and they’re just worlds apart.

Balenciaga, house photograph of evening ensemble.

Dress of black silk crepe with "chou" wrap of black silk gazar. Winter, 1967. Balenciaga archives.

What do you think about the end of couture? Do you think it will ever disappear? There’s a lot of fear about that today, I know that Chanel has been buying up a lot of the different craft houses like Lesage and opening the schools…Do you think that there will always be a couture market?

I think there will always be clients that want very special pieces and can afford to acquire them. I think that couture, like everything, will mutate. I think there are a lot of younger designers who wouldn’t necessarily consider themselves to be couturiers per se, who’re certainly using couture techniques and maybe a couture approach in their work. And, I certainly think that, now more than ever there’s a real interest in embroidery and embellishment and the possibilities of pleating and all those kinds of techniques that are very very couture-based. I think there are lots of young people who are very keen to learn those crafts. It’s very striking to me, going into couture workrooms now, and going to Lesage and those great couture suppliers and seeing how many young people there are there that really want to learn those crafts, and that might not have been the case a decade or two ago. So that kind of gives one hope for the future.

And I think just the general kind of global engagement and fascination with fashion now that’s come thru the kind of television programs you’ve spoken to – and just the instantaneous dissemination of information through the internet I think has really widened the world of fashion and I think made people more intrigued by all kinds of different areas of fashion. I certainly think haute couture and special pieces are very much a part of that.

Balenciaga. Detail of cocktail dress of fuchsia silk shantung, black lace and black silk ribbons. Summer, 1966.

Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco; Eleanor Christiansen de Guigne Collection. Photograph by Joe McDonald/FAMSF

Even with the expense of those kind of details? I remember in the Valentino documentary where he was going through his archive and he found this beautiful piece that had been done by Lesage and he said “You’d have to sell the bank of Italy to make that now”! The expense of it is getting astronomical, it seems.

Yes, it is. But there will always be women who just want that special thing and can afford to pay for it. You know, it’s like a custom sports car, or a rich-person’s toy…or art. So, I think there’s always a place for it, yes.

It is of course a very costly thing to do. Despite the cost of these garments, it’s a major loss-leader for any house. I think there are new ways of doing embroidery. I think there are incredible embroideries coming out of India that will change some of the pricing levels of that particular craft. And China, and so on. There are all kinds of approaches. And the wonderful thing about fashion is that it constantly mutates and reinvents itself – that’s the point of it. I think an approach to couture is something that will change like that too.

With that in mind, I was thinking about what you said about how long the shows were for Balenciaga. There were 200 models and they would take about 2 hours. Whereas today, there’s a maximum (usually in ready-to-wear only) but a maximum of 35 – 40 looks, they’re on and off the runway in 15 or 20 minutes, and then the line gets edited further before it ever goes to market. So, what do you think about that? Is there room for these designers to create and develop given the constraints of the season?

You have to think that in a Balenciaga show like that he’s basically showing his collection, his pre-collection, he’s showing everything that would be today in a designer’s showroom. It would be the options for the buyers that exist in the showroom off the runway, but he’s just showing the entire collection.

It’s so funny watching the videos of some of those shows, which luckily exist from the 1960s – I think 1960 – 1968, because clients get up in the middle of a show. You know, they have a hair appointment or a lunch at the Plaza D’Athénée, they leave and then sometimes come back…you know, for evening dresses or something. Or they’re just there because they need a coat or something, so they don’t need to stay for the cocktail dresses. It’s really funny – they sort of come & go. But you know there was no music. It was very austere, certainly couldn’t take photographs, you couldn’t sketch. You could just write down the number of the dress the mannequin was holding in her hand.

Gruau for Balenciaga, 1949.

I was thinking about the sketching and fashion illustration…I’m a big fan of Gruau, and he did a lot of wonderful images of Balenciaga; I feel like fashion illustration is something you don’t really see any more. It’s still taught, and it’s something that people dabble in, but it’s not really the art form used the way it was 50 years ago - as a commercial art form. Everything is photography-based now. So do you think that could ever come back – the fashion illustration?

Ah…I think it’s unlikely myself. I think great fashion illustrators will emerge and hopefully their work will be showcased in an appropriate way. I think that in the 20s & 30s often a detailed line drawing was a much more exact and precise way of describing an outfit than a photograph that might have had indeterminate reproduction in a magazine. So, informationally it had a different weight. We just live in a different world. I love illustration, fashion illustration myself – I’m very excited to see it.

I come out of the luxury fashion world, and I wondered what you think of this new world of the corporate fashion of LVMH and PPR group, and would a brand like Balenciaga have survived that?

Well, Balenciaga always resisted any kind of licensing agreement. Where Dior, Balmain, Jacques Fath all had licensees in America doing sort of high-end American ready-to-wear lines, he refused ever to do that. He refused any kind of endorsement. But still, his business was run along remarkably sound lines, so he just didn’t feel the need to do it. So I can’t imagine that he would want to be involved in the kind of corporate structures that now exisit, but he certainly had a very keen business sense and his business was very very well run and very profitable.

He had a hard-scrabble background, he was very pragmatic in the way he set up his companies. You know, clearly careful and scrupulous with money, to where it managed the way his businesses were run. He had business partners early on. The histories of those relationships are not that well documented…

Luchino Visconti's "The Leopard", 1963

I was recently watching The Pink Panther, and I found out that Yves Saint Laurent did the costumes for the principal characters.

Only for Claudia Cardinale. I think Givenchy did Capucine, and Saint Laurent did Claudia Cardinale...

I was wondering if Balenciaga he had ever received movie offers? Because you’d think he would be ripe for partnering with Luis Bunuel, or …

He did the costumes for Arletty in a 40s movie called Boléro, and...a couple of his actress-clients wore his clothes in their movies rather than him actually costuming them. It just wasn’t something it seems to have interested him. It was something Dior and Balmain did, Jacques Fath did, Chanel did. I think he just wasn’t interested, really.

So, what film do you go back to over & over for inspiration that you find interesting each time?

The Leopard – I love The Leopard. As sort of fashion movies, I really like The Red Shoes – it has great costuming. L’Année Dernière à Marienbad… I could always watch The Women...

Do you have more film projects yourself coming up? I know you were in Marie Antoinette, and Gossip Girl most recently…

And Wall Street 2… I don’t have any plans, but it’s always fun to be asked.

Do you ever think about writing or directing?

That would be intriguing, yes. Both of those options would be intriguing, yes.

And what about Oscars? Do you watch them, at home, or do you go?

I certainly watched the Golden Globes, I was much engaged. I’ve never been no, but I enjoy watching them.

What about the Royal Wedding coming up in April? Any thoughts on Kate Middleton? Are you a fan…?

I think she’s played it all very well, indeed. She’s stayed inscrutable which is a great challenge this day and age.

Do you think she’ll go with the Emmanuel’s?

No. I can’t imagine she would want to associate herself that closely with her late future mother in law. You know, it will be interesting to see. I think she’s made very sensible choices so far. So it will be intriguing. I wait with breath baited.

As we close, what do you recommend for any kind of a young designer, or even a writer, who writes about fashion & culture and things like that…What’s a good way to develop your visual sense, or your aesthetic sense? What’s a good way to gain exposure?

I think it’s just sort of saturating yourself in what’s going on in contemporary culture and going to museums and art galleries, and going to the theatre if you can, and certainly going to the cinema. I think it’s just being open to all kinds of cultural influences and zeitgeist – that’s how the zeitgeist is created. So, just being sensitive to that.

Balenciaga. Suit of mustard yellow linen; Summer, 1950. Collection of Hamish Bowles.

Photograph by Joe McDonald/FAMSF

And what was your first exposure to Balenciaga?

My first exposure, well, I was aware of him, and then the first piece I bought for my collection I was about 11 or 12 I think, was an early 60s Balenciaga suit at a charity sale. And, at the same sale there was a bolero – it was for a ballet company. A bolero had been donated by Margot Fonteyn, the great prima ballerina, and it was auctioned and sold for 60 pounds which was far more; it was 120 weeks worth of pocket money – so I couldn’t afford that.

But, incredibly enough, about 5 or 6 years ago I went to a vintage store in Los Angeles and found the same – I found the jacket there, and it’s going to be in the exhibition. It’s a wonderful matador-inspired bolero and a detail of the embroidery is the dust-jacket for the catalog. So you’re going to see it in all its glory!

Balenciaga and Spainopens at the de Young museum on March 26th.

Yves Saint Laurent at the de Young Museum

It's here! The 40-year retrospective of Yves Saint Laurent is now happily and beautifully displayed at the M.H. de Young museum in San Francisco's Golden Gate Park. I have been looking forward to today's press preview for months, and the whole morning was well worth waiting for!

I learned a few days ago that not only would the international curators of this exhibit be attending, but also some of Saint Laurent's best couture clients, close friend Betty Catroux, and one-time love and long-time business partner, Pierre Bergé. This was going to be quite the preview - as it should be! The Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco and the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts collaborated with the Fondation Pierre Bergé-Yves Saint-Laurent to create this comprehensive gathering of Saint Laurent's most iconic fashion ensembles, direct from the company archives.

Of course, the passing of Monsieur Saint Laurent earlier this year puts all of this into much higher relief, making the show not merely a simple a retrospective, but a celebration of the life and vision of this singular designer. Speaking so softly as to barely be heard above the snapping cameras, Monsieur Bergé opened his remarks by saying he wanted "to talk about Yves." It is clear that his own sadness at the passing of his friend and companion is still very close to the surface, with this gathering being especially poignant for him. Bergé and Saint-Laurent met in 1958 and opened the Maison Yves Saint-Laurent in 1961, with Bergé managing the business and operations end of the company. While the pair's personal relationship has sometimes been called "rocky", Bergé and Saint-Laurent remained in close for fifty years, with their mutual fondness and solidarity remaining steadfast.

Bergé said "Is fashion art? I don't know. I doubt [it]. What I know is to create fashion, you must be an artist."

The exhibition is arranged within four themes that truly celebrate Saint-Laurent the artist: Masterful Pencil Strokes, The YSL Revolution, The Palette, and Lyrical Sources. The arrangements show the different facets of his design and its far-reaching influences. Ensembles are grouped by similarity, not in chronological order. This allows the visitor to see how Saint-Laurent returned to the same inspirations throughout his forty years of design. The different themes could be called out to the viewer more clearly in the exhibition space, but the essences of color, shape, texture, and art are easily seen.

When I spoke with Jill D'Alessandro, associate curator of textiles at the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, she said that her "favorite" part was difficult to define, but that she was most fascinated by the contrasts and dichotomies he always explored. "Masculine/feminine, black/white, or how he took a painting - something flat and static - and put it onto something that moved." Certainly the three Mondrian dresses that are shown look as fresh and fabulous as the first time they appeared on the cover of Paris Vogue in 1965.

In a measure of true classics, truly timeless haute couture, there were many pieces that were many decades old but would still be very chic today. I spoke with Diane Charbonneau, exhibition co-curator and curator of contemporary decorative arts at the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, while standing in front of two gorgeous evening gowns that were designed in tribute to Henri Matisse. We both agreed that while the ensembles were at least 25 years old, both of us could wear them this evening and be the chicest women in town. It was this visionary design that made Saint Laurent a master, and all of this is on display from the cheetah prints to the stacks of bangles - the trends are still with us today.

Diane Charbonneau and I also agreed that the next greatest thing to see in person is the incredible craftsmanship. The opulent textiles and embellishments such as Lesage embroidery are a feast for the eyes. If anything, the exhibition could be seen as a celebration of fading handcrafts and subindustries of the world of haute couture. Houses like Lesage have been creating embroidery with thread, beads, riboons and sequins since the Belle Epoque, but are now among a dying breed of artisans that serve a clientele that is getting more and more rare. It is on the clothing of Yves Saint-Laurent that one can see this craft up close: an evening gown with appliques of Schiaparelli-inspired lips shows that no two sets of lips are identical - they are each shaped differently, with individual silhouettes and materials. It is this type of detail and collaboration between designer and craftsman that brings the greatness to this oeuvre.

As we visited the final group of literary ensembles, (a velvet tuxedo in tribute to Oscar Wilde would look perfect on Blair Waldorf if she were trying to dress like Chuck Bass...) I was introduced to Monsieur Bergé. I began by saying "Bonjour Monsieur!" and then quickly became tongue-tied as I realized that I should probably NOT embarrass myself by trying to speak French in that moment. So, I got nervous and sputtered something about enjoying his stay in San Francisco. I had always heard that he was ruthless in business and more than intimidating to his underlings - so who was this cute smiling man in front of me? He was warm, kind, and when he squeezed my wrist in farewell the gesture was unexpected, gentlemanly, and affectionate. I was completely flummoxed. It's not every day that I meet a living legend, and certainly not every day that they're actually nice about your being nervous around them.

Fans of Saint-Laurent can be fanatical, talking of the designer with a bit of a frenzied adoration and almost proprietary love. Once a devotee, always a devotee. My mother has always loved Yves Saint Laurent, which is why, as I've mentioned before, this was the first designer I ever knew. She still talks with fondness of her trousers, skirt and sweater purchased at the Boutique in Dallas years ago, and how she wished she'd had that odd $300 then to buy the peacoat too. I felt it was only appropriate then that I bring my Mom with me to this preview. Her favorite ensembles were from the 1976 Ballet Russes collection; when approaching a full-skirted mannequin with a fur vest and hat she said: "THIS was the one I always wanted..." This is definitely a show to feed everyone's closet dreams.

In a final note of cleverness: I loved that the museum put the entire press kit onto individual memory sticks, packaged into cute boxes with pink labels. They looked like slices of cake on a tray - delightful and smart. I also loved that we were each given the museum's own edition of the "Yves Saint Laurent Couture Coloring Book" - a very fun party favor for kids young and old. A very special thank-you to Jill Lynch at the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, and a huge congratulations to everyone involved in bringing this very special exhibit to our beautiful new museum - the exclusive venue for this exhibit in the United States. Do not miss this show - you will regret it!

Yves Saint Laurent at the de Young Museum

November 1st, 2008 - April 5, 2009

50 Hagiwara Tea Garden Drive

San Francisco, CA 94118

www.famsf.org

Please visit my Flickr feed for even more images from the Yves Saint Laurent exhibition. For my other posts on Yves Saint Laurent, please visit Master Class from June 2007, and Going Gauche from October 2006.

Pink & Black YSL Sketch by Yves Saint Laurent

Photo of Yves Saint Laurent & Pierre Bergé, Alice Spring 1983

All other images shown are by Poetic & Chic